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Table of Contents
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 67-68

Inevitable removal of left accessory ovary


1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ahmadi Hospital, Kuwait Oil Company, Ahmadi, Kuwait
2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ahmadi Hospital, Kuwait Oil Company, Ahmadi, Kuwait
3 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology No1, Marat Ospanov, West Kazakhstan State Medical University, Aktobe, Kazakhstan

Date of Submission11-Jul-2020
Date of Decision17-Aug-2020
Date of Acceptance04-Sep-2020
Date of Web Publication30-Jan-2021

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Ibrahim A Abdelazim
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ahmadi Kuwait Oil (KOC) Company Hospital, Ahmadi

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/GMIT.GMIT_99_20

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How to cite this article:
Abdelazim IA, AbuFaza M, Shikanova S, Karimova B. Inevitable removal of left accessory ovary. Gynecol Minim Invasive Ther 2021;10:67-8

How to cite this URL:
Abdelazim IA, AbuFaza M, Shikanova S, Karimova B. Inevitable removal of left accessory ovary. Gynecol Minim Invasive Ther [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Apr 21];10:67-8. Available from: https://www.e-gmit.com/text.asp?2021/10/1/67/308443



Dear Editor,

We read the article published in the Gynecology and Minimally Invasive Therapy journal entitled, “Inevitable removal of left accessory ovary,” by Tantitamit et al.[1] with great interest. The article by Tantitamit et al.[1] is an interesting, well-designed article, discussing an important subject.

Tantitamit et al.[1] mentioned that the accessory ovary is an extremely rare gynecologic condition, with a reported incidence of 1/93,000. Tantitamit et al.[1] defined the supernumerary ovary as entirely separated from the normal ovary, and is located at a different position, whereas the accessory ovary is defined as excess ovarian tissue that is situated near the normal ovary, which may or may not connect to it.[2],[3]

We agree with Tantitamit et al.[1] that the supernumerary and accessory ovaries are rare gynecologic conditions, but we presume that the incidence is somewhat different than that mentioned by Tantitamit et al.[1] In addition, it is better to define the ectopic, accessory, and supernumerary ovaries separately, according to the number and location of ovaries.

Nishio et al. reported that the supernumerary and accessory ovaries are rare conditions that occur in 1 in 29,000 and 1 in 700,000 gynecologic hospital admissions.[3]

In addition, it is better to define the ectopic, accessory, and supernumerary ovaries separately, according to the number and location of ovaries as follows:

Ectopic ovary was suggested by Lachman and Berman,[4] to replace both the terms supernumerary and accessory ovaries. It describes any ovarian tissue additional to the normal ovaries. Lachman and Berman[4] suggested that ectopic ovary may be further subclassified as follows: (a) postsurgical implants; (b) postinflammatory implants; or (c) true (ectopic) ovarian tissue.[4]

Supernumerary ovary is defined as an ovarian tissue entirely separated from the normally placed ovary. There is no ligamentous or direct connection with the ovaries, the broad ligament, the utero-ovarian ligament, or the infundibulopelvic ligament, and it arises from a separate primordial remnant.[2]

Accessory ovary is defined as an excess ovarian tissue that is situated near the normally placed ovary. It may be connected to the normally placed ovary, and it seems to have developed from it, possibly from the tissue that was split from the embryonic ovary during its development.[2]

In addition, autoamputation of the ovary was first reported by Sebastian et al. in 1973.[5] There is a consensus that autoamputation occurs after adnexal torsion.[3]

We would recommend the authors to clarify the actual incidence of the supernumerary and accessory ovaries. In addition, we would like to know the authors' opinion regarding the definition of ectopic, accessory, and supernumerary ovaries according to the number and location of ovaries.

Acknowledgment

The corresponding author is grateful to the co-authors for their effort through the revision and editing of this letter to the editor.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Tantitamit T, Lee CL, Kuo HH. Inevitable removal of left accessory ovary. Gynecol Minim Invasive Ther 2020;9:106-7.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Wharton LR. Two cases of supernumerary ovary and one of accessory ovary, with an analysis of previously reported cases. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1959;78:1101-19.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Nishio E, Hirota Y, Yasue A, Nishizawa H, Tsukada K, Udagawa Y. Two cases of ectopic ovary and one case of potential ectopic ovary. Reprod Med Biol 2011;10:51-4.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Lachman MF, Berman MM. The ectopic ovary. A case report and review of the literature. Arch Pathol Lab Med 1991;115:233-5.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Sebastian JA, Baker RL, Cordray D. Asymptomatic infarction and separation of ovary and distal uterine tube. Obstet Gynecol 1973;41:531-5.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

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